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Zaha Hadid: a new residential complex on the river bank

Admire the new skyscrapers with their ornateForms and bold decisions? Then you will be interested to get acquainted with the Australian project of the brilliant Zaha Hadid, "tied" to the picturesque bank of the river in Brisbane. More and more amazing skyscrapers are being built in the world. Most of them belong to large corporations, who are eager to demonstrate their power and consistency in this way. But there are other interesting projects, for example, Grace on Coronation by Zaha Hadid (Zaha Hadid), with whom we will get acquainted today. This residential complex, consisting of three skyscrapers, will be built by the end of 2015. Located on the banks of the river in Brisbane, cone-shaped buildings include 486 apartments and 8 villas. The project's budget amounted to 420 million Australian dollars, which are aimed at the development of one of the Brisbane districts with the amusing name Toowong (in translation - "inner west"). By the way, the area of ​​green plantations, whichAdjacent to the complex Grace on Coronation, will be 7,300 square meters. The construction of the building narrows down to minimize its presence and maximally open the quay for the public, create a dynamic space for Toowong citizens within the park by the river.

Zaha Hadid Each of the towers will haveMulti-level facade design. Consisting of glass and wrapped with reinforced concrete elements, it is like a flower wrapped in petals, which are located close to each other from the bottom, but open up and create beautiful outlines. Directed also to improve environmentalThe project will be implemented at the site of Australia's ABC Radio Network headquarters, where in 2006, 17 women were diagnosed with breast cancer due to elevated levels of radiation. By the time the construction began, this level has already stabilized. By the way, despite the global demolition of old buildings, one of the oldest residential buildings in Brisbane - one-story house Middenbury - will be preserved as a cultural heritage and will become part of the new development. dezeen.com

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